YWST: Low Range T-Case Gear Sets for the 1980-2007 Cruisers

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Mar 24, 2016
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Memphis, TN
Yeah, we stock that!

Land Cruiser Transfer Case Low Range Gear Sets

Sumo Gear sets are made to OE specifications in Japan. These popular gear sets offer transfer case gear reduction with the highest quality components on the market. Give us a call if you have any questions or would like to place an order!

SPLIT TRANSFER CASE: 8/1980-1/1990 4x/6x/7x Series (and later 7x's)



3:1 Low Range Gear Reduction Set - Split Case 8/1980-4/1986 4x/6x/7x Series
Fits Split-Cases with 34mm* Idler Shaft. No case machining required. Made in Japan to OE Toyota specifications. Includes new input, idler & high/low output gears.
Part# TCG808631 - $975.00 - IN STOCK

3:1 Low Range Gear Reduction Set- Split Case 4/1986-1/1990 6x/7x Series
Fits Split-Cases with 38mm* Idler Shaft, also fits 1990+ non US 7x/8x split style transfer cases, please call with VIN for verification. No case machining required. Made in Japan to OE Toyota specifications. Includes new idler & low speed output gears.
Part# TCG869031 - $650.00 - IN STOCK

View attachment 1394859

TCG808641 Shown

3.3:1 Low Range Gear Reduction Set - Split Case 8/1980-4/1986 4x/6x/7x Series

Fits Split-Cases with 34mm* Idler Shaft. Includes replacement input gear, idler gear assembly, idler shaft, idler bearings & thrust washers and high and low speed output shaft gears. Requires minor clearancing to case housing. Factory ratio is ~2.3:1, these 3.3:1 gears offer a ~45% low range reduction and a 10% high range reduction. Made in Japan to OE Toyota specifications.
Part# TCG808633 - $1050.00 - IN STOCK

3.3:1 Low Range Reduction Gear Set- Split Case 4/1986-1/1990 6x/7x Series

Fits Split-Cases with 38mm* Idler Shaft, also fits 1990+ non US 7x/8x split style transfer cases, please call with VIN for verification. Includes replacement input gear, idler gear assembly and high and low speed output shaft gears. Requires minor clearancing to case housing. Factory ratio is ~2.3:1, these 3.3:1 gears offer a 45% low range reduction and a 10% high range reduction. Made in Japan to OE Toyota specifications.
Part# TCG869033 - $950.00 - IN STOCK

4:1 Low Range Gear Reduction Set - Split Case 8/1980-4/1986 4x/6x/7x Series

Fits Split-Cases with 34mm* Idler Shaft. Includes replacement input gear, idler gear assembly, idler shaft, idler bearings & thrust washers and high and low speed output shaft gears. Requires clearancing to case housing. Factory ratio is ~2.3:1, these 4:1 gears offer a 75% low range reduction and a 10% high range reduction. Made in Japan to OE Toyota specifications.
Part# TCG808641 - $1050.00 - IN STOCK

View attachment 1394861
TCG869041 Shown

4:1 Low Range Reduction Gear Set- Split Case 4/1986-1/1990 6x/7x Series

Fits Split-Cases with 38mm* Idler Shaft, also fits 1990+ non US 7x/8x split style transfer cases, please call with VIN for verification. Includes replacement input gear, idler gear assembly and high and low speed output shaft gears & FIPG sealant. Requires clearancing to case housing. Factory ratio is ~2.3:1, these 4:1 gears offer a 75% low range reduction and a 10% high range reduction. Made in Japan to OE Toyota specifications.
Part# TCG869041 - $950.00 - IN STOCK

*Please verify idler shaft size by measuring the idler shaft where it protrudes from the back of your split transfer case. There is some noted overlap in the 34mm cases and some early uses of the 38mm cases. Please measure before ordering.









80/100 TRANSFER CASE: 1/1990-2007 8x/10x

View attachment 1615482
TCG9007ODHR Shown

80/100 High Range 10% Overdrive Gear Set - 8x/100 Series Land Cruisers
Fits 1/1990-1/1998 8x Series/LX450 and 98-07 100 Series Land Cruisers/LX470. Fits factory full-time (HF2A/HF2AV) transfer cases found in US Spec and global market Land Cruisers. These gears offer a 10% overdrive in high range, equivalent to converting axle gears from the 4.10 to 3.70 gears without having to do ring & pinion work.
Part# TCG9007ODHR - $495.00 - IN STOCK

80/100 High Range 10% Underdrive Gear Set - 8x/100 Series Land Cruisers
Fits 1/1990-1/1998 8x Series/LX450 and 98-07 100 Series Land Cruisers/LX470. Fits factory full-time (HF2A/HF2AV) transfer cases found in US Spec and global market Land Cruisers. These gears offer a 10% underdrive in high range, equivalent to converting axle gears from the 4.10 to 4.56 gears without having to do ring & pinion work.
Part# TCG9007UDHR - $495.00 - IN STOCK

View attachment 1394863
TCG900731 Shown

3.1:1 Low Range Reduction Gear Set - 80/100 Series Land Cruisers
Fits 1/1990-1/1998 8x Series/LX450 and 98-07 100 Series Land Cruisers/LX470. Fits both factory part-time (H1FA) and full-time (HF2A/HF2AV) transfer cases found in US Spec and global market Land Cruisers. Includes both low speed output gear and idler gear & FIPG sealant. Minor case clearancing is required using a die-grinder, otherwise these are a direct fit to your 80/100 Series transfer case. Factory ratio is 2.49:1, these 3.1:1 gears offer a 25% low range reduction with no change to the 1:1 high range. Made in Japan to OE Toyota specifications.
Part# TCG900731 - $705.00 - IN STOCK

View attachment 1673090
Any how-to videos on the TC regear for a 2006 100 series?
 

cruiseroutfit

Supporting Vendor
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Any how-to videos on the TC regear for a 2006 100 series?
There are some great YouTube videos and we will be continuing to work on our install instructions and ideally videos. As always your welcome to call us for any/all install details and I'll connect you with Olly here whom has set up many t-cases. :D
 

cruiseroutfit

Supporting Vendor
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If you've been on the fence, we'll have sale pricing kicking off next week on all of our t-case gearing options :cool:

If you need them to ship today, call and I'll make the pricing work :D
 

Azca

 
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
1,141
Location
Surprise AZ.
Hi Guys,

Finally got to install my gears. Took a bit longer as I also installed a new skid plate and buggered up the center diff lock install and had to drop the xfr again to get it sorted out. BIG shout out to Tools R Us for helping me out on this. More below. First of all, my overall impressions:

Only have 350 miles with the new gears, 10% UD and 25% low range reduction. There is a noticeable difference in acceleration and climbs slight highway hills with ease now. I have not had a chance to put this on the trail or on the freeway with real hills with some elevation (Phoenix to Flag) but have been on the Phoenix freeways and did get a chance to drop her into low range on a very easy dirt road. WOW! Extremely noticeable difference in low range. Go easy on the gas the first few times you use this, you will be absolutely surprised how much of a change there is. I am looking forward to getting her out on the trails to really try them out.

There is some additional noise, as reported elsewhere, on the road. The sound mimics electronic hum. It is noticeable with the radio off but is not bad at all. In fact, I really didn't notice this till a couple days later. I have MTs and cut off my exhaust resonator for by 4x Labs rear bumper along with a snorkel so, I already have a lot going on for the added noise department so a little more noise is no issue in my book.

The actual install went well. The video posted on Youtube was invaluable. Two sets of hands are a huge help when dropping the gear package back into the case.

Now for where I screwed up. I followed the directions precisely but, I still managed to get the center diff and the diff lock out of phase. I had to drop everything again to get it sorted out. SO, as a heads up to everyone who has yet to do this:
  1. Do not use FIPG on the diff lock actuator until AFTER you are sure you have them in phase.
  2. Hook up the actuator before installing it and turn the key to accessory. Make sure that it works as you cycle high to low and back again.
  3. Temporarily install the actuator and all electronics on the xfr case, raise it up and hook up the linkage to the transfer case lever.
  4. Turn on the key and work your way though the transfer case to make sure they are in phase. You MAY have to rotate the drive shaft to get it to lock.
  5. Once done, drop the case again so you can install the actuator with FIPG. DON'T forget to disconnect the transfer case linkage though!
  6. Button it up and test one more time before hitting the road.
One final thought. Once I tried it out I was getting an intermittent vibration under hard acceleration or turning. Initially I thought I had assembled something wrong. Long story short it was the exhaust pipe cushions, they had completely separated. My Hana Slider, which I had to remove and will sell, was helping to mask the failed cushions. Once I removed it, the exhaust pipe was free to rattle around as it liked. SO, as you our rigs are a tad old, if you are working on this anyway, replace the cushions while you are under the rig. You will thank me latter.

So Kurt, I am VERY happy with the product and look forward to putting them through the paces here in the near future. Thank you for getting us a much needed option!
 

MTKID

Mostly Stock
 
 
Joined
Mar 8, 2004
Messages
496
Location
Montana
There is some additional noise, as reported elsewhere, on the road. The sound mimics electronic hum. It is noticeable with the radio off but is not bad at all. In fact, I really didn't notice this till a couple days later. I have MTs and cut off my exhaust resonator for by 4x Labs rear bumper along with a snorkel so, I already have a lot going on for the added noise department so a little more noise is no issue in my book.
Is that minor additional noise expected to minimize or disappear over time?
 

Azca

 
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
1,141
Location
Surprise AZ.
I hope not, that means there will be no teeth on the gears left! I am not sure why there is a whine/hum. It, to me, is not annoying but it is present. Best suggestion I would have is to drive with someone who is going to replace these gears before and after the installation. That way you will be able to hear the difference. For me, the gains far outweigh the perceived nuisance the noise may cause. I am far more annoyed by the rattling piece of plastic on my sunroof that the hum. I really don't think it is that noticeable, I am very sensitive to noise.
 

bryson

I do stuff.
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Jan 3, 2008
Messages
1,079
Location
Utah
Is that minor additional noise expected to minimize or disappear over time?
The t-case gears are straight-cut, and are going to make noise - some gear noise is normal, and should be expected. It might diminish slightly over time as the gears wear, but I wouldn't expect a noticeable difference. These are noisier than stock gears (which are also straight-cut and make noise if you listen closely) because the lower ratio makes everything spin a bit quicker.

**edit for incorrect info**

Well, I'm fake news. See below:
All the gear in the transfer case are helically cut, they would be super noisy if they were straight cut.

The underdrive are noisier than stock as they are fudging numbers around to get the ratio. Properly designed gear trains should be near silent as long as they are in good working order(and with the proper gear design).



These are still a great option, and have proven reliable over seas, so I would have no worries about the noise and longevity.
 
Last edited:

Azca

 
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
1,141
Location
Surprise AZ.
One last item I found today. Please make sure you remove your air intake before lowering the transmission/xfr case. I cracked mine at the corrugations. Of course, I only realized this after I replaced the O2 sensors... :bang:
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
280
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Hi Guys,

Finally got to install my gears. Took a bit longer as I also installed a new skid plate and buggered up the center diff lock install and had to drop the xfr again to get it sorted out. BIG shout out to Tools R Us for helping me out on this. More below. First of all, my overall impressions:

Only have 350 miles with the new gears, 10% UD and 25% low range reduction. There is a noticeable difference in acceleration and climbs slight highway hills with ease now. I have not had a chance to put this on the trail or on the freeway with real hills with some elevation (Phoenix to Flag) but have been on the Phoenix freeways and did get a chance to drop her into low range on a very easy dirt road. WOW! Extremely noticeable difference in low range. Go easy on the gas the first few times you use this, you will be absolutely surprised how much of a change there is. I am looking forward to getting her out on the trails to really try them out.

There is some additional noise, as reported elsewhere, on the road. The sound mimics electronic hum. It is noticeable with the radio off but is not bad at all. In fact, I really didn't notice this till a couple days later. I have MTs and cut off my exhaust resonator for by 4x Labs rear bumper along with a snorkel so, I already have a lot going on for the added noise department so a little more noise is no issue in my book.

The actual install went well. The video posted on Youtube was invaluable. Two sets of hands are a huge help when dropping the gear package back into the case.

Now for where I screwed up. I followed the directions precisely but, I still managed to get the center diff and the diff lock out of phase. I had to drop everything again to get it sorted out. SO, as a heads up to everyone who has yet to do this:
  1. Do not use FIPG on the diff lock actuator until AFTER you are sure you have them in phase.
  2. Hook up the actuator before installing it and turn the key to accessory. Make sure that it works as you cycle high to low and back again.
  3. Temporarily install the actuator and all electronics on the xfr case, raise it up and hook up the linkage to the transfer case lever.
  4. Turn on the key and work your way though the transfer case to make sure they are in phase. You MAY have to rotate the drive shaft to get it to lock.
  5. Once done, drop the case again so you can install the actuator with FIPG. DON'T forget to disconnect the transfer case linkage though!
  6. Button it up and test one more time before hitting the road.
One final thought. Once I tried it out I was getting an intermittent vibration under hard acceleration or turning. Initially I thought I had assembled something wrong. Long story short it was the exhaust pipe cushions, they had completely separated. My Hana Slider, which I had to remove and will sell, was helping to mask the failed cushions. Once I removed it, the exhaust pipe was free to rattle around as it liked. SO, as you our rigs are a tad old, if you are working on this anyway, replace the cushions while you are under the rig. You will thank me latter.

So Kurt, I am VERY happy with the product and look forward to putting them through the paces here in the near future. Thank you for getting us a much needed option!
I travel to Flagg and Payson a lot, and run 33's, so I'm very interested in your assessment
 
Joined
May 15, 2006
Messages
1,348
Location
Ashland, OR
All the gear in the transfer case are helically cut, they would be super noisy if they were straight cut.

The underdrive are noisier than stock as they are fudging numbers around to get the ratio. Properly designed gear trains should be near silent as long as they are in good working order(and with the proper gear design).

The t-case gears are straight-cut, and are going to make noise - some gear noise is normal, and should be expected. It might diminish slightly over time as the gears wear, but I wouldn't expect a noticeable difference. These are noisier than stock gears (which are also straight-cut and make noise if you listen closely) because the lower ratio makes everything spin a bit quicker.
These are still a great option, and have proven reliable over seas, so I would have no worries about the noise and longevity.
 

bryson

I do stuff.
SILVER Star
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2008
Messages
1,079
Location
Utah
All the gear in the transfer case are helically cut, they would be super noisy if they were straight cut.

The underdrive are noisier than stock as they are fudging numbers around to get the ratio. Properly designed gear trains should be near silent as long as they are in good working order(and with the proper gear design).



These are still a great option, and have proven reliable over seas, so I would have no worries about the noise and longevity.
You are indeed correct. I knew I needed to double check my thinking before posting, I just didn't do it.:bang: Edited now.
 

Azca

 
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
1,141
Location
Surprise AZ.
Finally got mine on the I-17 freeway up to the Verde Valley from Phoenix. The vehicle could hold 67 mph, with the cruise control, all the way up. It felt to start huffing at about 3,400 feet on the 6% grade (the steepest point). Probably would have dropped below 65 if it was any longer. On the way back to PHX and out of the Verde Valley, she did great, never below 70 with room on the go pedal to spare, I believe I could have kept it at 75 or more if I wanted to. This run was a 6% grade as well and tops out a little over 4,700 feet.

So the gearing is a noticeable improvement. Did not have heavy traffic so I am not sure how much better she will respond when having to drop the RPM and try to accelerate up these stretches. Did not get to go all the way to Flag, will have to report back on that later.
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2014
Messages
676
Location
Mesa, AZ
Finally got mine on the I-17 freeway up to the Verde Valley from Phoenix. The vehicle could hold 67 mph, with the cruise control, all the way up. It felt to start huffing at about 3,400 feet on the 6% grade (the steepest point). Probably would have dropped below 65 if it was any longer. On the way back to PHX and out of the Verde Valley, she did great, never below 70 with room on the go pedal to spare, I believe I could have kept it at 75 or more if I wanted to. This run was a 6% grade as well and tops out a little over 4,700 feet.

So the gearing is a noticeable improvement. Did not have heavy traffic so I am not sure how much better she will respond when having to drop the RPM and try to accelerate up these stretches. Did not get to go all the way to Flag, will have to report back on that later.
This is awesome to hear. I am definitely interested in doing this now. What gear ratio would you think it is closer to 4.56 or 4.88?

I went up the 87 towards Payson yesterday and some of those long hills the LC struggled on 35s with the 4.10 stock gears.
 

LandCruiserPhil

Peter Pan Syndrome
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Messages
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Scottsdale Arizona
This is awesome to hear. I am definitely interested in doing this now. What gear ratio would you think it is closer to 4.56 or 4.88?

I went up the 87 towards Payson yesterday and some of those long hills the LC struggled on 35s with the 4.10 stock gears.
This is awesome to hear. I am definitely interested in doing this now. What gear ratio would you think it is closer to 4.56 or 4.88?

I went up the 87 towards Payson yesterday and some of those long hills the LC struggled on 35s with the 4.10 stock gears.
2nd gear will pull all the hills to and from Payson at 65 no problem.
 

HDJdreams

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Joined
May 9, 2013
Messages
620
Location
Rocky Mountains
I am thinking of living dangerously and regearing to 4.56 and running the 10% UD and 25% low range reduction.

Has anyone run this setup?
1.1 gears AND 4.56 axle gears??? Why?

Complete waste of money. Just regear axles to 4.88 (or 5.29.)

I HAVE the 1.1 gears (and 3.1). The whole point of them is to NOT have to touch axles. 4.56x1.1=5.01. No meaningful benefit over just 4.88 axle gears. The 1.1 gears are NOISY on the highway/freeway. If mud tires don’t bother you at all noise wise, you likely won’t care. I do and am thinking about pulling mine 1.1 gears out and regearing the axles.
 

HDJdreams

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Messages
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